How To Add Sources to the Mac Dictionary

It’s slow going so far with my edits in my 85k90 manuscript as I work on big picture development. Along with editing, I’ve been plugging away at my story bible and it’s starting to look like a real wiki. It’s also proving to be a great way to flesh out my story and find the parts that don’t stand up to scrutiny. So, despite the time it takes away from writing in my manuscript, it’s been well worth pursuing.

I’ve been using one of my favourite tools to help me with my work –  my Mac’s built in Dictionary app. It helps me find just the right word, define ones I sort of know but am unsure of, and get my facts straight using Wikipedia. That’s right. Wikipedia is built into my Mac. And yours too.

Finding Dictionary, Thesaurus and Wikipedia

Did you know you could easily access your Mac’s built in dictionary/dictionaries by highlighting a word in your document and right-clicking?  Scrivener also includes this app under Edit -> Writing Tools -> Look up in Dictionary and Thesaurus. You’ll notice there’s also a link for looking up in Wikipedia but I don’t take that route because it sends me to Safari and I want to stay right where I am. I can stay in Scrivener with the dictionary app while still enjoying a complete wikipedia experience. That’s great, right? But wait! There’s more…

If you want a quick definition, you can choose Look Up...  at the top of the list and get a pop up window with definitions from all of your dictionary sources (as well as App Store, Siri and iTunes results!) to open the Dictionary App itself, choose Open in Dictionary at bottom of the pop up or scroll down to Writing Tools -> Look up in Dictionary and Thesaurus in the right-click menu.

Pop Up Dictionary

Adding Sources

When the dictionary app opens, click on Dictionary ->Preferences in the main menu to be presented with a checklist of sources you can download into your Dictionary App. Now you can click on individual sources in the tab menu or choose All to see a listing of all available info.

Dictionary Sources on Mac

I added all of the English speaking sources. One of them is Wikipedia which brings up entry pages from the website and is the quickest and easiest way to find info while writing that I know of.

Wikipedia Entry in Dictionary App

Translations to and from English are also available in a variety of languages including French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese Dutch and Korean.

All sources will download individually to your computer when you check them off so pick only the ones you’ll actually use to keep it light.

Not seeing what you need?

You can find third party dictionary files to be found online (or, if you’re a real keener, make a dictionary yourself). With a bit of searching, I managed to find this set of dictionaries on GitHub. If any of these are useful to you, click on the green clone or download button at the top the list and choose Download Zip.

downloading dictionaries from GitHub

The entire folder of dictionaries will download. Open the folder you’re interested and find the file that ends in .dictionary. The icon will look like a lego piece.

In the dictionary app, choose File -> Open Dictionaries Folder and drag the .dictionary folder into the open folder. Add as many as you need.

Once you have what you need. Close the dictionary app and reopen it. At the bottom of the preferences checklist (Dictionary -> Preferences) you should see the dictionaries you added. Check them and they will appear in the app. You may need to widen the window to see them if you have a lot of dictionaries available.

And that it!

A wealth of info is now available to you where and when you need it with a simple right-click.

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Creating a Story Bible Using Scrivener

When I started my manuscript, it was a spur of the moment decision based on last year’s NaNoWriMo start and idea I had rolling around in my head only days before. I took no time for planning or research and now, as I begin my developmental edit, I’m suffering as a result.

So I’ve made the decision to veer off from my 85k90 timeline for research and to create a story bible to get and keep me on track.

Initially, I thought of using a wiki platform for my Story Bible and wasted a perfectly good writing day researching my options. Too much work, and for what?

It was only after scouring every other possible solution that I realized I already had what I needed. Scrivener.

*NOTE: Instructions and template are for Scrivener 3 on a Mac *

Why use Scrivener?

Using Scrivener, I am able to link existing files or create new ones on the fly.  I can link text documents I created as well as anything I’ve put in the research folder. Not only can I link to files, I can also embed images, tables (although these are terribly finicky so beware), audio and video files into my text files to create a robust story bible filled with information on my world and the people and places in it.

Indexing Files

I had a bit of trouble figuring out how to organize my files in the binder to make things as easy to find as I could. I’ve decided on an alphabetical structure (like an index) but I could also use a nesting folder structure based on subject (eg: characters, locations, cities, history, etc.). Here’s my structure.

*UPDATE* I’ve added an index along the top of my entry template as well as a HOME link so that I can Hide the Binder and use it as a single pane app. In my current project’s Story Bible, I also have added other important links as well as a table at the bottom of each page for links to research media. To add an entry rather than a blank page, right-click on the relevant section of the binder and choose Add -> New From Template -> Entry

 

 

To add content, I started creating file names in the appropriate folders. I then created a link list on the folder itself of every file that could be included. I did this by clicking on the folder to populate the editor and then dragging each item onto it and using styles to format the result as a list.

On the homepage, I can add a synopsis of the story and link to the most useful items, add images with links to other content, include research items, anything I’d like to use as a jumping off page for exploring content.

Useful Topics

Besides the obvious character and setting/location information, there are myriad ways to enliven your writing with detail. Here’s a sampling of topics  I’ve chosen to investigate:

  • Decor
  • Transportation
  • Fashion
  • Food/Drink
  • Slang
  • Music
  • Politics
  • History
  • Hairstyles
  • Religion
  • Climate

In Scrivener, you can nest files as well as folders. You can also convert files to folders and folders to files using the cog icon > Convert to Folder at the bottom of the Binder. Whether you use a file or folder to convey the structure of your Story Bible is up to you. Do whatever makes sense for you.

Once you have your broad topics stubbed in, you can further break them down into subtopics such as Climate > Winter. Be as general or as thorough as you need to be to give yourself a solid grounding in your fictional world.

Creating Internal Links

To create internal links in Scrivener, select a target and right click to find Link to Document or find it under Edit in the top menu. If your target has the same name as the file you’re looking for, you will find it easily in suggested documents. Otherwise, you’ll have to drill into the folders to find it.

You also have an option to create a new linked document by selecting New Link… A pop up window appears for you to put in the relevant details.

Right click on selected word (or look under Edit) to find Link to Document > Create New Link
Right click on selected word (or look under Edit) to find Link to Document > Create New Link

Template Sheets

What I have here is very bare bones. If you want to add any specialty template sheets, do so before filling anything out and then save as your own version this template by choosing File > Save as Template and renaming it.

Want to use my template? Here you go… Indexical Story Wiki.scrivtemplate

How To Install the Template

This template and the following illustrations are for Mac users. If you have a  Windows machine, Scrivener is available for you as well but you’ll need to find instructions elsewhere.

Templates are stored in the Application Support folder in the Library folder of your Mac. I had a hard time finding this folder. It turns out, if you buy an app from the App Store rather the company site, this Application Folder is tucked away in another section of the Library. These instructions offered on the Scrivener Forum cleared it up for me.

Did you buy either Scrivener 2 or Scrivener 3 from the Mac App Store by any chance? If so, because of the way the Mac App Store’s sandboxing partitions things, Scrivener 3 will not be able to see Scrivener 2’s project templates. However, if you bought both from our own store, Scrivener 2’s project templates should still show up.

If you bought Scrivener 2 from our store, the templates will be at this location:

~/Library/Application Support/Scrivener/ProjectTemplates

If you purchased it from the Mac App Store, they will be here:

~/Library/Containers/com.literatureandlatte.scrivener2/Data/Library/Application Support/Project Templates

(You can access the ~/Library folder by holding down Option/Alt when opening the “Go” menu in the Finder – this makes the “Library” item visible, which is normally hidden.)

You can then copy the templates to a different location temporarily, and then use the “Options” button in the project templates chooser in Scrivener 3 to access the “Import Templates…” option, and choose the files you placed in the temporary location to import them.

All the best,
Keith

Thanks Keith!

Once it’s placed in the folder, it will show up in the Chooser under Miscellaneous.

Conclusion

You might think that filling out your Story Bible is busywork, maybe even a form of procrastination. I thought that as well but, as I work through it, I’m finding out lots of information, getting it down and linking it in ways I hadn’t thought of before.

Once it’s finished (and even while I’m working on it!), I’ll be able to search for relevant info, use it to check my manuscript for inconsistencies bring the details of my characters’ daily lives to life for both me the reader.

If you’re like me and you dove right into your story without first getting an in depth view your world, take some time to create your own Story Bible. Your narrative will be richer for it.

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85k90 – Day 10 – Cut and Paste

Yesterday’s cut and pasted scenes from the past couple of days really needed to be dealt with today. I had to stop cutting and pasting and start going through the material with fresh eyes, rewriting much of it and fleshing out the scant details from the 50,000 word NaNoWriMo version. I thought it would be a chore – messy, hard to pick up. I’ve had that experience in the past working on another manuscript during an earlier NaNo attempt to write a novel. It was dismal and I soon gave up.

This time, it wasn’t bad at all once I got going. In fact, it came together well, thanks to my ongoing novel journaling and Scrivener‘s ability to cut up blocks of text into individual scenes. If you don’t know how to do that, let me give you a little tutorial.

First, I cut and pasted in a large section of text into one of my scenes. After reading it in this new context, I saw that the second half of it needed it’s own scene – perhaps even it’s own chapter – and that I needed to add a scene between what I had previously written and the first half of the pasted text. No problem.

First, I placed my cursor where I wanted to split the file in two. Then I went to the menu at the top under Documents -> Split -> at selection for a simple splitting into two documents in the binder.

If I’d wanted to, I could select some text and split with the selected text as the title of the new file but it’s not necessary here. I had a new scene to work with and it was already started!

I also needed another scene before the new one so I created a new scene file and tucked it in between. I added synopses to these three scenes to remind myself what I wanted from each of them and I was ready to go.

Right now, I’m still working on the first of the three new scenes in which one of my characters, Steph, arrives at work and chats up her friend Wanda. Because I’ve organized the cut and paste into three distinct scenes, I have my writing sorted until the weekend.

Hot damn, it feels good.

A Year With 85k90

2017 marked the third year I participated in NaNoWriMo which, for those who don’t know, is an international event encouraging writers to complete a 50,000 draft in just 30 days during the month of November. With many thousands of participants, it’s kind of a big deal.

I’ve managed to “win” all three years but, guess what? I still don’t have a completed manuscript. Why is that?

Well, for one thing, 50,000 words isn’t considered novel length. I found that I could accomplish little more than an outline and a few fleshed out scenes but nothing substantial. I simply needed more space.

Why didn’t I just carry on until I finished the thing, you ask? I’ve asked myself the same question every December for that past three years but the truth is, I need the structure of a program or I end up getting sucked back into day to day responsibilities and Netflix binges. I’ve given up thinking of this as a failing, something that I need to overcome. Instead, I am going to work with it and find structures that support my efforts.

I can’t afford more schooling and online workshops are too short and assignment focused to get the job done.

Enter 85k90. I can’t remember how I ran into this cryptic code but I do remember there was a link and I followed it, read the about page and immediately signed up.

The 85K Writing Challenge began as a small Facebook group, running our first 85K during the first 90 days of 2016. Our goal was simple. Write 85,000 words in 90 days – January through March.

Three whole months to write a story the size of an adult novel means no ridiculous cramming sessions, time to think about what I’m writing, research, change direction, but it’s so much more than that. 85k90 is a year long adventure, with a goal of going from first draft to published by the year’s end.

This is exactly what I need. Hold my hand, 85k90. I’m not proud.

I know, I know. Just because you wrote it, doesn’t mean the publishers will come. But, at least, now I have a structure to follow which will, hopefully, set me on a challenging, sustainable path to finishing what I started.

Yesterday was Day One of my adventure and I did little more than cut and paste the first scene from my NaNoWriMo draft into a new Scrivener document and fill out a little more detail and a bit of a flashback. But, it’s a 3,015 word beginning.

I’ve decided to blog about this experience here on bonybits and let my readers, if any, learn from my experience. Previously, I’ve been using this site as a repository for odd bits of text gleaned from years of secret notes and journal entries and, to be honest, I’ve been adrift.

Now that I have a goal and a structure, I’m sure things will pick up.