85k90 – Day 10 – Cut and Paste

Yesterday’s cut and pasted scenes from the past couple of days really needed to be dealt with today. I had to stop cutting and pasting and start going through the material with fresh eyes, rewriting much of it and fleshing out the scant details from the 50,000 word NaNoWriMo version. I thought it would be a chore – messy, hard to pick up. I’ve had that experience in the past working on another manuscript during an earlier NaNo attempt to write a novel. It was dismal and I soon gave up.

This time, it wasn’t bad at all once I got going. In fact, it came together well, thanks to my ongoing novel journaling and Scrivener‘s ability to cut up blocks of text into individual scenes. If you don’t know how to do that, let me give you a little tutorial.

First, I cut and pasted in a large section of text into one of my scenes. After reading it in this new context, I saw that the second half of it needed it’s own scene – perhaps even it’s own chapter – and that I needed to add a scene between what I had previously written and the first half of the pasted text. No problem.

First, I placed my cursor where I wanted to split the file in two. Then I went to the menu at the top under Documents -> Split -> at selection for a simple splitting into two documents in the binder.

If I’d wanted to, I could select some text and split with the selected text as the title of the new file but it’s not necessary here. I had a new scene to work with and it was already started!

I also needed another scene before the new one so I created a new scene file and tucked it in between. I added synopses to these three scenes to remind myself what I wanted from each of them and I was ready to go.

Right now, I’m still working on the first of the three new scenes in which one of my characters, Steph, arrives at work and chats up her friend Wanda. Because I’ve organized the cut and paste into three distinct scenes, I have my writing sorted until the weekend.

Hot damn, it feels good.

A Year With 85k90

2017 marked the third year I participated in NaNoWriMo which, for those who don’t know, is an international event encouraging writers to complete a 50,000 draft in just 30 days during the month of November. With many thousands of participants, it’s kind of a big deal.

I’ve managed to “win” all three years but, guess what? I still don’t have a completed manuscript. Why is that?

Well, for one thing, 50,000 words isn’t considered novel length. I found that I could accomplish little more than an outline and a few fleshed out scenes but nothing substantial. I simply needed more space.

Why didn’t I just carry on until I finished the thing, you ask? I’ve asked myself the same question every December for that past three years but the truth is, I need the structure of a program or I end up getting sucked back into day to day responsibilities and Netflix binges. I’ve given up thinking of this as a failing, something that I need to overcome. Instead, I am going to work with it and find structures that support my efforts.

I can’t afford more schooling and online workshops are too short and assignment focused to get the job done.

Enter 85k90. I can’t remember how I ran into this cryptic code but I do remember there was a link and I followed it, read the about page and immediately signed up.

The 85K Writing Challenge began as a small Facebook group, running our first 85K during the first 90 days of 2016. Our goal was simple. Write 85,000 words in 90 days – January through March.

Three whole months to write a story the size of an adult novel means no ridiculous cramming sessions, time to think about what I’m writing, research, change direction, but it’s so much more than that. 85k90 is a year long adventure, with a goal of going from first draft to published by the year’s end.

This is exactly what I need. Hold my hand, 85k90. I’m not proud.

I know, I know. Just because you wrote it, doesn’t mean the publishers will come. But, at least, now I have a structure to follow which will, hopefully, set me on a challenging, sustainable path to finishing what I started.

Yesterday was Day One of my adventure and I did little more than cut and paste the first scene from my NaNoWriMo draft into a new Scrivener document and fill out a little more detail and a bit of a flashback. But, it’s a 3,015 word beginning.

I’ve decided to blog about this experience here on bonybits and let my readers, if any, learn from my experience. Previously, I’ve been using this site as a repository for odd bits of text gleaned from years of secret notes and journal entries and, to be honest, I’ve been adrift.

Now that I have a goal and a structure, I’m sure things will pick up.